A Smartphone to Help Keep the Elderly Safe

Though senior citizens are generally less fascinated than younger generations with the bells and whistles of mobile devices, they could soon find themselves relying on a new smartphone app built by Rutgers students to help them avoid falling. Falls are the leading...

How a huge landslide shaped Zion National Park

A Utah mountainside collapsed 4,800 years ago in a gargantuan landslide known as a “rock avalanche,” creating the flat floor of what is now Zion National Park by damming the Virgin River to create a lake that existed for 700 years. Those are key conclusions of a new...

Dancing hairs alert bees to floral electric fields

Tiny, vibrating hairs may explain how bumblebees sense and interpret the signals transmitted by flowers, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol. Although it’s known that flowers communicate with pollinators by sending out electric...

Bacterial immunization prevents PTSD-like symptoms in mice

Injecting mice with a UCL-discovered bacterium can reduce stress and inflammation, preventing them from developing PTSD-like conditions, finds a new international study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. The research, published in Proceedings of the National...

Genes for nose shape found

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a UCL-led study. The four genes mainly affect the width and ‘pointiness’ of noses which vary greatly between different populations. The new information adds to our understanding of how the human face...

Effects of maternal smoking continue long after birth

Early exposure to nicotine can trigger widespread genetic changes that affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth, a new Yale-led study has found. The finding helps explains why maternal smoking has been linked to behavioral changes such as...

Scientists uncover potential trigger to kill cancer

Melbourne researchers have discovered a new way of triggering cell death, in a finding that could lead to drugs to treat cancer and autoimmune disease. Programmed cell death, also called apoptosis, is a natural process that removes unwanted cells from the body....

Mouse study links heart regeneration to telomere length

Researchers at the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research have discovered that the ends of heart muscle cell chromosomes rapidly erode after birth, limiting the cells’ ability to proliferate and replace damaged heart tissue. The study,...

Deep, old water explains why Antarctic Ocean hasn’t warmed

The waters surrounding Antarctica may be one of the last places to experience human-driven climate change. New research from the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology finds that ocean currents explain why the seawater has stayed at...

The brain clock that keeps memories ticking

Just as members of an orchestra need a conductor to stay on tempo, neurons in the brain need well-timed waves of activity to organize memories across time. In the hippocampus–the brain’s memory center–temporal ordering of the neural code is important...

Tasty fat: X-rays finding the blueprint of why fat is yummy

Fat free ice cream, for all its healthy merits, melts the wrong way. Two seconds on the tongue and it’s a slush of milk, flavoring and water instead of the rich glob of slowly melting cream we grew to love as kids. When it comes to taste memories, fats are...

Fasting-like diet reduces multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Scientists discovered that the diet triggers a death-and-life process for...

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