Researchers seek efficient means of splitting water

Photovoltaics promise to help meet our energy needs by turning sunlight into electricity. We can’t run everything that way, but with a little tweaking, photovoltaic materials can use solar energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Cornell researchers are...

Early human ancestor did not have the jaws of a nutcracker

South Africa’s Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the renowned archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans. Research published in 2012 garnered...

Faces of black children as young as 5 evoke negative biases

A new study suggests that people are more likely to misidentify a toy as a weapon after seeing a Black face than a White face, even when the face in question is that of a five-year-old child. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the...

Realizing your true (solar) potential

Nations worldwide are increasingly embracing solar power as an alternative electricity source for homes, buildings, and even the grid. Since 2008, installed solar capacity in the United States alone has grown 17-fold, from 1.2 to 20 gigawatts (GW), according to the...

Orangutans: Lethal aggression between females

Researchers have for the first time witnessed the death of a female orangutan at the hands of another female. Even more extraordinary is that the perpetrator recruited a male orangutan as a hired gun to help her corner and attack the victim. Before this observation,...

Online shopping might not be as green as we thought

Logic suggests that online shopping is “greener” than traditional shopping. After all, when people shop from home, they are not jumping into their cars, one by one, to travel to the mall or the big box store. But a multi-year regional study at the...

The fat that refuses to disappear

Obese people aren’t always big because they eat too much. Some types of fat tissue won’t go away no matter how much one diets or exercises. And you don’t necessarily have to be large or overweight to suffer from these conditions. To aid the study of potential genetic,...

A new-generation exoskeleton helps the paralyzed to walk

Until recently, being paralyzed from the waist down meant using a wheelchair to get around. And although daily life is more accessible to wheelchair users, they still face physical and social limitations. But UC Berkeley’s Robotics and Human Engineering Laboratory has...

Saturn’s enormous B-ring: Great vista, less filling

After examining hidden density waves from Saturn’s B-ring – the largest of the planet’s awe-inspiring, cosmic bands – astronomers confirm that this circular object is as lightweight as it is opaque. Their findings are published online in the journal Icarus. Philip...

When ‘retail therapy’ makes you feel worse

If you just flubbed a big work project, you might be feeling down on yourself. Maybe you’ll head to the mall to indulge in a little retail therapy. Buying products is a common way to make yourself feel better, with half of all Americans reporting that they do it. But...

Enjoy your sneeze: It may mean you won’t get brain cancer

If allergy season has you sneezing, wheezing or itching, is your risk of developing a deadly form of brain cancer less? No one can say for sure, but researchers found an inverse association between allergies, asthma and eczema and a brain cancer called glioma, meaning...

How Gut Inflammation Sparks Colon Cancer

Chronic inflammation in the gut increases the risk of colon cancer by as much as 500 percent, and now Duke University researchers think they know why. Their new study points to a biomarker in the cellular machinery that could not only serve as an early warning of...

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