When machines can do any job, what will humans do?

Rice University computer scientist Moshe Vardi expects that within 30 years, machines will be capable of doing almost any job that a human can. In anticipation, he is asking his colleagues to consider the societal implications. Can the global economy adapt to greater...

Americans’ support for science remains strong

A large majority of Americans have favorable views of science and scientists, believing that the benefits from science outweigh any negatives and agree that science and technology will create more opportunities for future generations. This is according to a survey of...

Eating breakfast could help obese people get more active

Eating breakfast causes obese people to be more active, according to the latest research published from researchers at the University of Bath (UK). The study, from health scientists based within the University’s Department for Health and published in the leading...

Sleep apnea takes a toll on brain function

One in 15 adults has moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which a person’s breathing is frequently interrupted during sleep — as many as 30 times per hour. People with sleep apnea also often report problems with thinking such as poor...

Giant bird browsed in the Arctic twilight 50 million years ago

Strange as it may seem, a bird bigger than Big Bird once lived above the Arctic Circle. The flightless bird, known as Gastornis, roamed Ellesmere Island next to Greenland about 50 million years ago, even during the twilight months of winter. Once thought to be a...

Imaging with an optical brush

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have developed a new imaging device that consists of a loose bundle of optical fibers, with no need for lenses or a protective housing. The fibers are connected to an array of photosensors at one end; the other ends can be left to wave...

Dementia Risk Varies Significantly Among Racial And Ethnic Groups

In the largest and longest study thus far of ethnic disparities in dementia risk, researchers compared six ethnic and racial groups within the same geographic population and found significant variation in dementia incidence among them. The results are published online...

Gene Signature Could Lead To A New Way Of Diagnosing Lyme

Researchers at UC San Francisco and Johns Hopkins may have found a new way to diagnose Lyme disease, based on a distinctive gene “signature” they discovered in white blood cells of patients infected with the tick-borne bacteria. Even though it is hard to diagnose,...

When the boss’ ethical behavior breaks bad

Is your boss ethical? Does he or she do what’s right, as opposed to what’s profitable? If so, they may turn downright abusive the next day. New research on leader behavior by Russell Johnson, associate professor of management at Michigan State University, suggests...

Male biology students consistently underestimate female peers

Female college students are more likely to abandon studies in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines than their male classmates, and new research from the University of Washington suggests that those male peers may play a key role in undermining...

Decade of rising seas slowed by land soaking up extra water

New measurements from a NASA satellite have allowed researchers to identify and quantify, for the first time, how climate-driven increases of liquid water storage on land have affected the rate of sea level rise. A new study by scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion...

I want her to want me: Where men, sex and personality meet

A man walks into a bar. He thinks the attractive woman smiling at him from across the room wants to have sex with him. True? Or is it all in his head? Research has shown that in general, men have a tendency to misjudge a woman’s sexual intent, often based on...

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