Chronic insomnia can lead to anxiety and depression


July 3, 2007
Brain & Behavior, Health, Uncategorized

Everyone has an occasional night of bad sleep. For most people, insomnia lasts only a few days and goes away without treatment. However, factors such as stress can cause a higher level of insomnia that may last for several weeks. This kind of insomnia may not go away on its own, and can lead to both short- and long-term health problems if left untreated. According to a study published in the July 1st issue of the journal SLEEP, chronic insomnia can increase one’s chances for developing anxiety disorders and depression.

The study, conducted by Dag Neckelmann, MD, PhD, of Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway, was based on data collected from 25,130 adults from two general health surveys. Dr. Neckelmann found significant relations between the longitudinal course of chronic insomnia and the development of anxiety disorders and depression. Compared to the group of participants without chronic insomnia in both surveys, the group with chronic insomnia had increased associations to having developed anxiety disorders and depression.

“Chronic insomnia is a state marker of both anxiety disorder and depression,” said Neckelmann. “From a clinical point of view, these results imply that individuals reporting chronic insomnia, in addition to receiving adequate treatment for their sleep disturbance, should be carefully examined for the presence of anxiety disorder as well as depression.”

Focusing on chronic insomnia as a symptom of both anxiety and depression may facilitate the early detection of a mental disorder, as well as the detection of comorbidity, said Nechelmann, who added that, though not demonstrated, alleviating chronic insomnia may reduce the risk of developing anxiety disorders.

Insomnia is a classification of sleep disorders in which a person has trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early. These disorders may also be defined by an overall poor quality of sleep.

Insomnia is the most commonly reported sleep disorder. About 30 percent of adults have symptoms of insomnia. Less than 10 percent of adults are likely to have chronic insomnia. Insomnia is more common among elderly people and women.

Those who think they might have insomnia, or another sleep disorder, are urged to discuss their problem with their primary care physician, who will issue a referral to a sleep specialist.

http://www.aasmnet.org



Chronic insomnia can lead to anxiety and depression

6 Responses to Chronic insomnia can lead to anxiety and depression

  1. Anonymous January 14, 2010 at 9:10 am #

    Anxiety disorders are a unique group of illnesses that fill people’s lives with persistent, excessive, and unreasonable anxiety, worry, and fear. They include generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and specific phobias. Although anxiety disorders are serious medical conditions, they are treatable.
    An anxiety disorder and a co-occurring chronic pain disease can make a person’s health more difficult to treat. But a variety of treatments and lifestyle changes can offer relief. Possible health complications are noted below:
    •Increased disability or reduced functioning
    •Poorer quality of life
    •Poorer response to treatment
    •Poorer treatment adherence
    •Increased perception of disease severity
    Chronic pain sufferers who also have an anxiety disorder may have lower pain tolerance or a lower pain threshold. People with an anxiety disorder may be more sensitive to medication side effects or more fearful of harmful side effects of medication than chronic pain suffers who aren’t anxious, and they may also be more fearful of pain than someone who experiences pain without anxiety.
    Source : chronic-anxiety.com

  2. Anonymous July 28, 2009 at 3:46 am #

    I’m 13 years old and yea,ive had a pretty rough life,a lots happened so ive had to grow up really fast in order to make it in my household.
    Well ive been on anti depressants for about 6 months now for my panic attacks,and depression.The summer has just started and a lot is changing.Most in bad ways but some good.Ever since the beginning of the summer i just can NOT sleep and truly its putting me into an even worse depression.I just get more and more upset every night because its just making me so mad that i just can not sleep,ever.I try and talk to my dad and his girlfriend but all they say is “oh your a kid and its summer blah blah” But honestly i’m sick of hearing that.
    I know what my body is going through and they just refuse to get me help.
    and i know that i myself,need some god damn sleep.

  3. Anonymous January 26, 2010 at 3:49 pm #

    Anxiety disorders are a unique group of illnesses that fill people’s lives with persistent, excessive, and unreasonable anxiety, worry, and fear. They include generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and specific phobias. Although anxiety disorders are serious medical conditions, they are treatable.
    An anxiety disorder and a co-occurring chronic pain disease can make a person’s health more difficult to treat. But a variety of treatments and lifestyle changes can offer relief. Possible health complications are noted below:
    • Increased disability or reduced functioning
    • Poorer quality of life
    • Poorer response to treatment
    • Poorer treatment adherence
    • Increased perception of disease severity
    Source: chronic-anxiety.com

  4. Anonymous October 19, 2007 at 7:09 pm #

    Had insomnia all my life I”m 39 no friends no social life. I had friends just lost contact years ago. It”s very hard for me to hold down a job . Nobody understands me cant explain

  5. Brian123456789 July 7, 2007 at 4:38 pm #

    I suggest letting the nature people help you.
    There is a clinic in Bountiful Utah. Modern health clinic.
    Definetely sounds like an endocrine system going wacky.
    You have to get help and slowly detox.
    you can then medicate with food.
    There are other modalities available.
    What does a full blood work up look like on you.
    Did you get your PTH hormone checked.
    Did you get a Ferritin or IBC test done?

  6. lisa July 6, 2007 at 3:18 am #

    Hello. I have been dealing with chronic insomina for almost 12 years. I have tried everything and haven’t found anything on the the market that works for me! It is interesting that someone has finally connected the dots! been telling my doctors this for years. hormonel problems at a very young age that I began treating early on with over the counter sleep meds which you quickly develop a tolerence to, stopped working completelyI am now on phena barbatol because I can stay up for 4 to 5 days and have been doing so for years. ive quit working, no social life, withdrawn from everyone i know and love because something new has begun to happen, I’ve begun having granmal seizures so i’m basicially waiting to die because this is hell, losing sight, hearing, memory.. forget it, gone! don’t know who will read this and i really don’t know why i wrote this, yes I do, desperation!

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