Research points to a new treatment for pancreatic cancer

Researchers have shown how controlling cholesterol metabolism in pancreatic cancer cells reduces metastasis, pointing to a potential new treatment using drugs previously developed for atherosclerosis. “We show for the first time that if you control the...

Scientists discover potentially habitable planets

Is there life beyond our solar system? If there is, our best bet for finding it may lie in three nearby, Earth-like exoplanets. For the first time, an international team of astronomers from MIT, the University of Liège in Belgium, and elsewhere have detected three...

Fat-fighting nanoparticles

Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed nanoparticles that can deliver antiobesity drugs directly to fat tissue. Overweight mice treated with these nanoparticles lost 10 percent of their body weight over 25 days, without showing any negative...

Genetic switch could be key to increased health and lifespan

Newly discovered genetic switches that increase lifespan and boost fitness in worms are also linked to increased lifespan in mammals, offering hope that drugs to flip these switches could improve human metabolic function and increase longevity. These so-called...

Genetic switch could be key to increased health and lifespan

Newly discovered genetic switches that increase lifespan and boost fitness in worms are also linked to increased lifespan in mammals, offering hope that drugs to flip these switches could improve human metabolic function and increase longevity. These so-called...

Endangered venomous mammal predates dinosaurs’ extinction

The University of Illinois and University of Puerto Rico have completely sequenced the mitochondrial genome for the Hispaniolan solenodon, filling in the last major branch of placental mammals on the tree of life. The study, published in Mitochondrial DNA, confirmed...

You may have already decided to read this article

Sometimes, decisions we believe we make consciously, such as clicking on a link on a webpage or reaching for a cup of coffee, have already been made — a trick of the mind that may happen more than we think, new research by Yale University psychologists suggest. “Our...

New tech uses hardware, software to train dogs more efficiently

North Carolina State University researchers have developed and used a customized suite of technologies that allows a computer to train a dog autonomously, with the computer effectively responding to the dog based on the dog’s body language. “Our approach...

Why can’t a woman play tennis like a man?

Changing court conditions to address differences in men’s and women’s play might make women’s tennis matches more competitive, according to a new study by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and other Israeli researchers. Many sports adapt rules...

Spotting hidden activity in cells

Inside every living cell, internal structures are continuously moving about. Under a microscope, organelles such as the nucleus, mitochondria, transport vesicles, or even external flagella wobble and twitch. This may happen spontaneously as these tiny structures are...

Math without numbers

Symbols don’t always have to be part of the equation to understand math, according to cognitive neuroscientist Elizabeth Brannon. Brannon started her research studying monkeys to understand how non-human animals think about numbers, and whether they can perform...

Biofluorescent catsharks, glowing in the deep

A team of researchers including scientists from the American Museum of Natural History and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of California San Diego found that catsharks are not only able to see the bright green biofluorescence they produce, but that...

Researchers dive into big data to predict NBA winners

Before you place any bets on the next NBA playoff games, take a look at UC Merced professor Harish Bhat’s Twitter account. He’s tweeting daily predictions based on an innovative new algorithm, and so far this postseason, he’s right about 80 percent of the time. In...

Cheaters never win, new study finds

Cheating to get ahead is likely to reduce your level of happiness. That’s according to a new study by University of California, Riverside sociology professor Jan E. Stets. The study, titled “Happiness and Identities,” was published in the journal Social Science...

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