Figs may inhibit growth, survival of harmful microbes in food

New studies show that figs and figs extracts may be effective at inhibiting the survival and growth of harmful microbes in food. For years, trees throughout Europe and the Mediterranean have been cultivated and fig extracts have been used to fight various ailments such as constipation, bronchitis, mouth disorders and wounds. Externally, they are found in the latex used in ridding patients of warts.From the American Society for Microbiology :Figs may inhibit growth and survival of harmful microbes in food

New studies show that figs and figs extracts may be effective at inhibiting the survival and growth of harmful microbes in food. Researchers from North Carolina A&T State University present their findings today at the 104th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

For years, trees throughout Europe and the Mediterranean have been cultivated and fig extracts have been used to fight various ailments such as constipation, bronchitis, mouth disorders and wounds. Externally, they are found in the latex used in ridding patients of warts.

In the research presented today, Maysoun Salameh and colleagues examined the antimicrobial effect of figs extracts on the reduction and inhibition of microbial loads of the popular food contaminants, E.coli and Salmonella. Figs were sliced and blended into liquid after which strains of E.coli and Salmonella were added to the solution. After an incubation period of up to twenty-four hours, results showed a reduction in bacterial growth. Control samples not treated with fig juice revealed an increase in bacteria.

”These findings can be utilized by the food industry in the future by adding figs extracts, its original and/or modified liquid form, to processed foods,” says Salameh. ”Its active component can also be isolated into pure forms as natural food additives into many food products.”

In a related study also presented today, another group of researchers from North Carolina A&T will present data illustrating the antimicrobial properties of guava extract and its potential use as an all natural food preservative.


The material in this press release comes from the originating research organization. Content may be edited for style and length. Have a question? Let us know.

Subscribe

One email, each morning, with our latest posts. From medical research to space news. Environment to energy. Technology to physics.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.