BioSTARTM device achieves 90 percent closure rate for atrial septal defect in children

A novel study by Canadian physicians reported that the BioSTARTM biodegradable implant achieved comparable closure rates to the Amplatzer Septal OccluderTM (ASO) in children with atrial septal defect (ASD). The BioSTAR device displayed successful outcomes, while avoiding issues associated with implants containing substantial amounts of metal. Results of the study, the first to compare the BioSTAR device with the ASO in children, are now available online and in the July print issue of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.

ASD is a congenital heart defect where a hole is present in the wall between the two upper heart chambers. While smaller ASDs may close on their own in early life, larger defects may require surgery to close the opening. If left untreated, ASD may increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or stroke later in life. The incidence of atrial septal defects ranges from one-twentieth to one-tenth of all congenital heart lesions.

During the study period of November 1, 2007 through November 30, 2008 there were 54 children who underwent ASD closure with the ASO implant. The ASO group subjects’ median data were: age of 7.4, weight of 23.3 kg, defect size of 10 mm, and balloon stretched size of 12.7 mm. The BioSTAR implant was used in 10 patients where a small to moderate defect was anticipated by non-invasive studies. In this group, patients’ median data were: age of 11, weight of 39.6 kg, defect size of 10 mm, and balloon stretched size of 11.5 mm.

Study results indicated the acute and 6-month follow up closure rate for the BioSTAR were both 90%, compared with 100% for both time periods with the ASO implants. “Our study provides evidence that the BioSTAR implant achieves comparable closure rates to the ASO device in small- to moderate-ASD,” said lead study author Lee Benson, M.D., FSCAI. “Minimal foreign material remains after 6 months with the biodegradable implant, reducing the risks associated with devices containing significant amounts of metal.” The study team noted that decreased long-term thrombogenicity, preserved transseptal access, decreased inflammatory response, and reduced potential of arrhythmogenicity and erosion were benefits of using biodegradable implants.

The team reported no serious complications in either group. However, statistically significant differences in the median procedure time (BioSTAR-52 minutes; ASO device-39.5 minutes) and fluoroscopy times (BioSTAR-6.7 minutes; ASO device-6.1 minutes) were observed. “Longer procedure and fluoroscopy times are a drawback of the BioSTAR implant, but should improve with familiarity with the device and deployment system,” Dr. Benson concluded.

Article: “A Biodegradable Device (BioSTARTM) for Atrial Septal Defect Closure in Children.” Gareth Morgan, Kyong-Jin Lee, Rajiv Chaturvedi, and Lee Benson. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions; Published Online: March 1, 2010 (DOI:10.1002/ccd.22517); Print Issue: July 2010. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123305965/abstract

This study is published in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Intervention. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact healthnews@wiley.com.

Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions is the official journal of The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. This international journal covers the broad field of cardiovascular diseases. Subject material includes basic and clinical information that is derived from or related to invasive and interventional coronary or peripheral vascular techniques. The journal focuses on material that will be of immediate practical value to physicians providing patient care in the clinical laboratory setting. To accomplish this, the journal publishes Preliminary Reports and Work In Progress articles that complement the traditional Original Studies, Case Reports, and Comprehensive Reviews. Perspective and insight concerning controversial subjects and evolving technologies are provided regularly through Editorial Commentaries furnished by members of the Editorial Board and other experts. Articles are subject to double-blind peer review and complete editorial evaluation prior to any decision regarding acceptability. For more information, please visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117934745/grouphome/home.html.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc., with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world’s leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or www.interscience.wiley.com.

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) is the primary professional association for invasive and interventional cardiologists, representing over 4,300 physicians in 60 countries. The Society’s mission is to promote excellence in invasive and interventional cardiovascular medicine through physician education and representation, its monthly journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, and the advancement of quality standards to enhance patient care. For more information, please visit http://www.scai.org or SCAI’s comprehensive patient education website, www.seconds-count.org.


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