Layered limestone deposits give unique insight to Roman aqueducts

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Mineral-rich waters originating from the Apennine Mountains of Italy flowed through ancient Rome’s Anio Novus aqueduct and left behind a detailed rock record of past hydraulic conditions, researchers said. Two studies characterizing layered limestone – called travertine – deposits within the Anio Novus are the first to document the occurrence of anti-gravity growth ripples and establish that these features lend clues to the history of ancient water conveyance and storage systems.

Editor’s notes:

To reach Bruce Fouke, call 217- 217-244-5431; email fouke@illinois.edu.

To reach Marcelo Garcia, call 217-244-4484; email mhgarcia@illinois.edu.

The papers “Travertine crystal growth ripples record the hydraulic history of ancient Rome’s Anio Novus aqueduct” and “Depositional and diagenetic history of travertine deposited within the Anio Novus aqueduct of ancient Rome” are available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau.


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