Human heart tissue generated from embryonic stem cells

Human heart tissue has for the first time been created in the laboratory. Generated from embryonic stem cells, the tissue could be used for testing and creating new drugs, for genetic studies, for tissue engineering and for studying the effects of various stresses on the heart. “Everyone imagines the possibilities of embryonic stem cells in repairing broken hearts, but stem cell technology offers even more — and it offers it much earlier,” said Dr. Lior Gepstein of the Technion Faculty of Medicine who headed the study. “Currently, we test drugs on animals, but we would get more reliable results if we tested them on the actual human tissues.”From the American Society for Technion – Israel Institute of Technology :Human heart tissue generated from embryonic stem cells
To be used for testing drugs, genetic studies, tissue engineering

NEW YORK, N.Y. and HAIFA, ISRAEL, January 13, 2003 ? Human heart tissue has for the first time been created in the laboratory. Generated from embryonic stem cells at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, the tissue could be used for testing and creating new drugs, for genetic studies, for tissue engineering and for studying the effects of various stresses on the heart.
A paper detailing the development was published in Circulation Research (October 2002).

“Everyone imagines the possibilities of embryonic stem cells in repairing broken hearts, but stem cell technology offers even more — and it offers it much earlier,” said Dr. Lior Gepstein of the Technion Faculty of Medicine who headed the study. “Currently, we test drugs on animals, but we would get more reliable results if we tested them on the actual human tissues.”

He added that a variety of tissue types, from neurons to pancreas, could be generated through the same methods.

Even after extensive testing on humans, drugs are often found to have unexpected side effects, sometimes on an unrelated organ or tissue. Having human organs and tissues available in the lab could preclude these “surprises,” according to Dr. Gepstein.

By observing the electrical signals in heart tissue researchers could also study the effect of various drugs and growth factors as well as different stresses. Moreover, this tissue can also be used to study which genes are activated as the heart develops, examine the impact of genetic mutations, and develop new drugs based on these observations. Finally, the ability to generate human tissue outside the body may advance the rapidly developing field of tissue engineering which attempts to combine functional cells with three-dimensional scaffolds to create tissue substitutes.


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