Tomato juice keeps emphysema at bay in new model

Feeding tomato juice to mice kept them from developing emphysema after cigarette smoke exposure that was long enough to induce emphysema in a control group, Japanese researchers report in February issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

Newer football helmet design may cut concussions in HS players

Newer football helmet technology and design may reduce the incidence of concussions in high school football players, according to results from the first phase of a three-year study by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s (UPMC) Sports Medicine Concussion Program. The current study compared concussion rates and recovery times of high school athletes wearing newer helmet technology to those wearing helmets with traditional designs. There was no significant difference in recovery time between the two helmet groups.

89 per cent of men with penile implants are able to have sex

Nine out of ten men fitted with a penile prosthesis were able to have sexual intercourse and eight out of ten were satisfied with the overall results, according to research published in the latest issue of BJU International. The researchers, from St Peter’s Hospital and The Institute of Urology in London, studied 447 men who had received 504 implants over a 25-year period. Subjects ranged from 21 to 78 with an average age of 52 and were monitored for an average of just over four years.

AIDS Drug from Sunflowers

Sunflowers can produce a substance which prevents the AIDS pathogen HIV from reproducing, at least in cell cultures. This is the result of research carried out by scientists at the University of Bonn in cooperation with the Caesar Research Centre. For several years now the hopes for a completely new group of AIDS drugs have been pinned to what is known as ‘DCQA’. However, the substance is only available in very small quantities and is thus extremely expensive. By using the Bonn method it could probably be produced for a fraction of the costs.

Young Galaxies Grow Up Together in a Nest of Dark Matter

Astronomers have found clear indications that clumps of dark matter are the nursing grounds for new born galaxies about twelve billion light years away. A single nest of dark matter can nurture several young galaxies. These results from researchers at the Space Telescope Science Institute, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and the University of Tokyo confirm predictions of the currently dominant theory of cosmology known as the Cold Dark Matter model.