Ovarian cancer screening saves few lives

The best currently available screening tests can only slightly reduce ovarian cancer deaths. That is the conclusion of new research published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The results suggest that st…

Why so many antibodies fail to protect against HIV infection

DURHAM, NC — Researchers have been stymied for years over the fact that people infected with the AIDS virus do indeed produce antibodies in response to the pathogen — antibodies that turn out to be ineffective in blocking infection.
Now, sci…

Tiny molecules protect from the dangers of sex

DURHAM, N.C. — Pathogenic fungi have been found to protect themselves against unwanted genetic mutations during sexual reproduction, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. A gene-silencing pathway protects the fungal genome fr…

2 studies find new genetic links to ovarian cancer risk

DURHAM, N.C. — An international consortium of scientists has discovered new genetic variants in five regions of the genome that affect the risk of ovarian cancer in the general population, according to two separate studies published today (Sunday)…

Gene discovery could yield treatments for nearsightedness

DURHAM, N.C. — Myopia (nearsightedness) is the most common eye disorder in the world and becoming more common, yet little is known about its genetic underpinnings.
Scientists at Duke University Medical Center, in conjunction with several other gr…

Where the fat’s at

In real estate, location is everything. The same might be said of lipids — those crucial cellular fats and oils that serve as building blocks for cells and as key energy sources for the body.
In a paper published in the September issue of…

‘Immortalized’ Cells Enable Researchers to Grow Human Arteries

In a combination of bioengineering and cancer research, a team of Duke University Medical Center researchers has made the first arteries from non-embryonic tissues in the laboratory, an important step toward growing human arteries outside of the body for use in coronary artery bypass surgery.

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