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Tag: environmental science and technology

Overfertilizing corn undermines ethanol

Rice University scientists and their colleagues have found that when growing corn crops for ethanol, more means less. A new paper in today's online edition of the American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science and Technology shows how ...

Review confirms benefits of outdoor exercise

A systematic review carried out by a team at the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry has analysed existing studies and concluded that there are benefits to mental and physical well-being from taking exercise in the natural environment. Their...

Virus killer gets supercharged

A simple technique to make a common virus-killing material significantly more effective is a breakthrough from the Rice University labs of Andrew Barron and Qilin Li. Rather than trying to turn the process into profit, the researchers have put it ...

Effect of 6 mT SMF on phagocytosis depends on macrophage differentiation...

The interest in the biological effects of non-ionizing Electro Magnetic Fields (EMFs) and Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on the whole organism, as well on cellular systems, has noticeably increased in recent years in consideration of their increased ...

Special section on ecological distribution conflicts in the journal Ecological Economics

Researchers from Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), and other universities have published a special section in the journal Ecological Economics that analyzes the link between ecolog...

Many urban streams harmful to aquatic life following winter pavement deicing

This USGS report is published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology and is available as a free download online at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es101333u. The use of salt to deice pavement can leave urban streams toxic to aquat...

Nature’s filter: Wetlands clean selenium from agricultural runoff

Researchers have found a natural detox program for selenium-contaminated farm runoff in the form of wetland vegetation and microbes. Results from a two-year study show that man-made wetlands in California's San Joaquin Valley were able to remove an average of 69.2 percent of the selenium in agricultural drainage water. More significantly, some plant populations showed remarkable promise at converting selenium into a harmless gas consisting primarily of dimethyl selenide. That means less of the selenium would end up in sediment or plant tissue.

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