Tuning graphene film so it sheds water

Windshields that shed water so effectively that they don’t need wipers. Ship hulls so slippery that they glide through the water more efficiently than ordinary hulls.
These are some of the potential applications for graphene, one of the hottest n…

Insect eyes inspire improved solar cells

WASHINGTON, Jan. 20 — The eyes of moths, which allow them to see well at night, are also covered with a water-repellent, antireflective coating that makes their eyes among the least reflective surfaces in nature and helps them hide from predators …

Debunking solar energy efficiency measurements

In recent years, developers have been investigating light-harvesting thin film solar panels made from nanotechnology — — and promoting efficiency metrics to make the technology marketable. Now a Tel Aviv University researcher is providing new…

Reading ‘Avatar’s’ DNA

Tel Aviv — You know when you’re watching a pirated film downloaded from the Internet — there’s no mistaking the fuzzy footage, or the guy in the front row getting up for popcorn. Despite the poor quality, pirated video is a serious problem a…

Subsidies have no effect on Spanish cinema productivity

Awards have an impact on Spanish movie productivity, since they increase internal and external distribution demand, but subsidies have no effect whatsoever on the productivity of the Spanish film industry. This is the conclusion of researchers a…

The digital film reel

In the production of films for movie theaters and cinemas, digital technology is pushing the film reel aside much more slowly than it does with photography. Up until only a few years ago, mainly 35 mm cameras were being used, and sales of digital mo…

Diamond film may enable critical new sensors for bioterror fight

In this time of the chronic threat of terrorism and the possibility of war with an adversary who may be armed with biological weapons, high on the wish list of security agencies and battlefield commanders is a quick and easy way to detect the presence of dangerous biological agents. Now, with the help of a novel diamond film developed by chemists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the age of the inexpensive, compact sensor that can continuously scan airports, subways and battlefields for the slightest trace of biological weapons may be at hand. Coupled with modern electronics, the new sensors would not only be able to detect nearby biological agents, but also sound alarms and even call for help.

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