Physical environment influences stem cell development

Jerusalem — September 6, 2010 — A researcher at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, together with Israeli and foreign collaborators, has revealed how physical qualities — and not only chemical ones — may have an influence in determining…

Faster method for growing adult stem cells for bone regeneration

A new method for utilizing adult stem cells for bone or other tissue regeneration without having to go through the intermediate step of expanding the number of cells in tissue culture has won a Kaye Innovation Award for a young doctoral student at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Kaye Awards, now marking the tenth anniversary year of their inception, were presented on May 27 during the 66th meeting of the Hebrew University Board of Governors meeting in Jerusalem.

Einstein Archives to Be Available Online

More than 900 scientific and nonscientific documents of one of the most influential intellects in the modern era, Albert Einstein, will soon be available online for the first time. The Einstein Archives Online website, at http://www.alberteinstein.info, will also be accompanied by an extensive database of archival information. It will be launched on May 19 during a daylong symposium on his life and work, to be held at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

New biological sensors for detecting blood glucose

Research conducted by scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory has paved the way for development of highly efficient sensors for measuring blood glucose in diabetic patients. Particles the size of a nanometer (that is, one billionth of a meter), which are the building blocks of the science of nanotechnology, have comparable dimensions to animal or plant proteins, thus enabling the integration of these components into hybrid systems exhibiting novel properties.

New study ties moderate beer drinking to lower heart attack risk

A beer a day may help keep heart attacks away, according to a group of Israeli researchers. In preliminary clinical studies of a group of men with coronary artery disease, the researchers showed that drinking one beer (12 ounces) a day for a month produced changes in blood chemistry that are associated with a reduced risk of heart attack.
Their study adds to growing evidence that moderate alcohol consumption may reduce the risk of heart disease, the number one killer in the United States.

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