Fruit consumption related to increased risk of Parkinson's?

Researchers in Honolulu have found a correlation between high fruit and fruit drink consumption and risk of Parkinson’s disease. Previous studies have suggested a link between fruit and vitamin C intake and an increased risk of Parkinson’s. However, these studies have been primarily retrospective in design and are subject to recall bias. The current study is longitudinal, in which risk factor data was collected before onset of Parkinson’s among more than 8,000 study subjects. Incidence of Parkinson’s cases was noted over 34 years of observation. Results of the study show that increased fruit and fruit drink consumption predicted an increased Parkinson’s risk, after adjusting for other known risk factors.

Ibuprofen, aspirin may offer protection against Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have found evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen, may exert a protective effect against the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Results of their epidemiological, multiple-study analysis of nearly 16,000 patients are being presented at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting in Honolulu, March 29-April 5, 2003.