Choosing organic milk could offset effects of climate change

Wetter, cooler summers can have a detrimental effect on the milk we drink, according to new research published by Newcastle University.
Researchers found milk collected during a particularly poor UK summer and the following winter had signific…

Roman coin hoard points to early recycling

A hoard of Roman coins discovered by metal-detecting enthusiasts on a farm near Longhorsley, Northumberland, could be evidence that entrepreneurial native Northumbrian settlers were recycling old bronze coins and making trinkets to sell back to soldiers in the Roman army, according to experts. The hoard of 70 Roman coins ? 61 sesterii and 9 dupondii ? dates from the reign of the Emperors Vespasian to the reign of Marcus Aurelius (AD69-180 ? a period when the Antonine Wall, between Glasgow and Edinburgh, and not Hadrian’s Wall, marked the frontier of the Roman Empire, and for a short period, Northumberland, which had until then been barbarian territory, became part of the Roman Empire.

Research project promises faster, cheaper and more reliable microchips

A project between academia and industry is aiming to spark a world electronics revolution by producing faster, cheaper and more reliable microchips. The University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, has joined forces with Amtel to create ‘strained silicon’ microchips, which involves adding a material called germanium to the traditional silicon used in semiconductor manufacturing. Atmel, whose silicon chips find applications in such diverse products as smart cards and game consoles like XBOX, is playing host to a team of five Newcastle University researchers led by top microelectronics professor Anthony O’Neill. “With this process we can create strained silicon microchips, which will be much faster or use less battery power than conventional microchips” explained Professor Anthony O’Neill, who leads a team of 5 researchers. The team, hosted by Atmel, aim to produce the world’s first strained silicon technology.

New drug could help target cancer cells with deadly accuracy

Researchers in Britain have developed a drug they say could revolutionize the effectiveness of radiation on cancer. Radiotherapy is used to destroy cancer cells by zapping their DNA, thus disrupting their ability to function and reproduce. But like other cells in the body, cancer cells have a sort of DNA repair kit that can minimize these effects. The new drug disables the DNA repair process and allows radiotherapy to target tumors with “deadly accuracy.”

Get more stuff like this
in your inbox

From anti-aging to the search for alien life, we promise to never bore.