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‘Unnatural selection’ in popular Panamanian seafood

Like most residents of Panama's Isla Colón, UCLA archaeologist Thomas Wake has enjoyed more than a few plates of Caribbean fighting conch in the...

Chimp empathy key to understanding human engagement

In their latest study about empathy, Yerkes National Primate Research Center researchers Matthew Campbell, PhD, and Frans de Waal, PhD, have shown chimpanzees exhibit...

Living on Islands Makes Animals Tamer

Most of us have seen pictures and probably YouTube videos of “tame” animals on the Galapagos Islands, the biological paradise that was Charles Darwin’s major source of...

Rising Ocean Acidification Leads to Anxiety in Fish

A new research study combining marine physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and behavioral psychology has revealed a surprising outcome from increases of carbon dioxide uptake in...

Signalers vs. strong silent types: Sparrows exude personalities during fights

Like humans, some song sparrows are more effusive than others, at least when it comes to defending their territories. New findings from the University...

Fossil of new big cat species discovered; oldest ever found

The oldest big cat fossil ever found – which fills in a significant gap in the fossil record – was discovered on a paleontological...

Dueling infections: 1 keeps the other at bay

If the idea of hookworms makes you shudder, consider this: Those pesky intestinal parasites may actually help your body ward off other infections, and...

How do you cut a nanotube? Lots of compression

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- A pipefitter knows how to make an exact cut on a metal rod. But it's far harder to imagine getting a precise cut on a carbon nanotube, with a diameter 1/50,000th the thickness of a human hair. In a pape...

First genetic response in animal species to global warming

For the first time ever, researchers have discovered that an animal species has changed its genetic make-up to cope with global warming. In the past, organisms have shown the flexibility--or plasticity--to adapt to their surroundings, but this is the first time it has been proven a species has responded genetically to cope with environmental forces.

‘Love those bee-stung lips’: Facial markings help wasps identify each other

Looking good, ladyPaper wasps all look the same, right? An animal behaviorist at Cornell University reports that the wasp's black-and-yellow uniform is not uniform at all. One wasp, she has discovered, can recognize another through facial and abdominal markings, all but displacing the scientific dogma that insects carry out identification and communication only by employing chemicals called pheromones. "Their faces are far more beautiful and different than you'd expect," says Elizabeth Tibbetts.

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