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For first time, scientists show an HIV vaccine impacts the genetic...

An AIDS vaccine tested in people, but found to be ineffective, influenced the genetic makeup of the virus that slipped past. The findings suggest new ideas for developing HIV vaccines. The results were published Feb. 27 in Nature Medicine. ...

Well-known molecule may be behind alcohol’s benefits to heart health

Many studies support the assertion that moderate drinking is beneficial when it comes to cardiovascular health, and for the first time scientists have discovered that a well-known molecule, called Notch, may be behind alcohol's protective effects. D...

New class of biomolecules triggered in response to respiratory virus infection

For the first time, scientists have discovered that a poorly understood class of RNA produced in a mammal's cells during a respiratory virus attack may affect the outcome of the infection. Their findings are reported today in mBio, a journal of t...

Wind's energy transfer to ocean quantified for first time

Scientists have finally been able to field-test theories about how wind transfers energy to ocean waves, a topic of debate since the 19th century that had previously proved impossible to settle experimentally. The new results may help lead the way to the resolution of a longstanding problem in scientists' understanding of how energy and momentum are exchanged between the atmosphere and the oceans.

New age for Mungo Man, new human history

A new study has finally got scientists to agree on the age of Mungo Man, Australia's oldest human remains, and the consensus is he is 22,000 years younger. Mungo Man's new age is 40,000 years. The research also boosted the age of Mungo Lady, the world's first recorded cremation, by 10,000 years putting her at the same age as Mungo Man. It is the first time scientists have reached a broad agreement on the ages of the Lake Mungo remains.

Anthrax probe to use new methods

Nearly a year after an editor at American Media Inc. died from anthrax exposure, FBI officials said a new search of the contaminated ghost-like AMI building could find the source of the fatal spores and the person who unleashed them. The Miami Herald reports the search of the shuttered Boca Raton building will use new and different techniques than those employed in an initial search last fall. "Last year, we were in the building for a different reason," the paper quotes Hector Pesquera, the FBI's special agent in charge of the Miami division. "This investigation will be scientifically driven for a criminal investigation." Last year's investigation focused on mailrooms and areas surrounding the infected employees' workstations. This time, scientists will search the entire three-story, 67,000-square-foot building. American Media publishes several tabloid newspapers, including The National Enquirer.

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