Fish oil linked to increased risk of colon cancer in mice

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Fish oil — long encouraged by doctors as a supplement to support heart and joint health, among other benefits — induced severe colitis and colon cancer in mice in research led by Michigan State University and published t…

‘Gold’ fish thrive, cancers die

Rice University physicist Dmitri Lapotko has demonstrated that plasmonic nanobubbles, generated around gold nanoparticles with a laser pulse, can detect and destroy cancer cells in … Read more

Female fish abandoned by males to raise offspring on their own

Caring for children can be a tough job, particularly if you are a female cichlid fish.
Native to the crater lakes of Nicaragua, cichlid fish look after their young by defending them against would-be predators. While male and female cichlid fish g…

Global fisheries research finds promise and peril

Global fisheries, a vital source of food and revenue throughout the world, contribute between US$225-$240 billion per year to the worldwide economy, according to four new studies released today. Researchers also concluded that healthier fisheries co…

Ending the oceans’ ‘tragedy of the commons’

Leading international marine scientists are proposing radical changes in the governance of the world’s oceans to rescue them from overfishing, pollution and other human impacts.
Based on a successful experiment in Chile, the researchers say a new …

Researchers mimic fish for new underwater vehicle

Researchers have developed an artificial neural network for use with an autonomous underwater vehicle named Fetch. Characteristics of different fish species were compiled using the side scan sonar data. This information was then grouped into test sets used for training artificial neural networks (ANNs). The team combined the use of enhancement algorithms and image processing, in conjunction with the ANNs, to “teach” the computer to recognize the characteristics of various fish species.

Mucky waters could spell doom for fish populations

A lack of oxygen in waters around the world could be doing more than just suffocating fish: It may be acting as an endocrine disruptor and impeding their ability to reproduce, posing a serious threat to the survival of many populations. A new study of carp suggests that hypoxia, or oxygen deficiency, is an endocrine disruptor. The findings add a surprising member to the growing list of potential hormone-disturbing agents ? a list that includes pesticides such as atrazine and DDT, various types of steroids and metals, and even ultraviolet light. And because it occurs across vast stretches of water around the world, hypoxia could be a greater concern than any of these.

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