Chemists grow unusually long and aligned 'buckytubes'

North Carolina chemists have developed a method of growing one-atom-thick cylinders of carbon, called “nanotubes,” 100 times longer than usual, while maintaining a soda-straw straightness with controllable orientation. Their achievement solves a major barrier to the nanotubes’ use in ultra-small “nanoelectronic” devices, said the team’s leader. The researchers have also grown checkerboard-like grids of the tubes which could form the basis of nanoscale electronic devices.

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