Home Tags Obstetrics gynecology

Tag: obstetrics gynecology

Increased contraceptive supply linked to fewer unintended pregnancies

Rates of unintended pregnancies and abortions decrease significantly when women receive a one-year supply of oral contraceptives, instead of being prescribed one- or three-month supplies, a UCSF study shows. Researchers observed a 30 percent red...

SMFM highlights significance of spina bifida research findings

SAN FRANCISCO (February 10, 2011) -- More than two thousand physicians, some of the top obstetric/gynecologists in the world who specialize in maternal-fetal medicine, especially high risk pregnancies, gathered today for their annual meeting in Sa...

Physicians lead MomDocFamily support group

Being a mother is one of life's most difficult jobs. Getting through medical training and then juggling clinical practice, teaching, and research at the local university make the rigors of motherhood infinitely more challenging. A group of physici...

Study links increased BPA exposure to reduced egg quality in women

A small-scale University of California, San Francisco-led study has identified the first evidence in humans that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may compromise the quality of a woman's eggs retrieved for in vitro fertilization (IVF). As blood lev...

Pitt team finds protein that sets the stage for exchanges of...

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 13 -- A team led by a scientist at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has discovered a regulatory protein that influences where genetic material gets swapped between maternal and paternal chromosomes during the process...

Moms who don’t breastfeed more likely to develop type 2 diabetes

PITTSBURGH, Aug. 27 -- Mothers who did not breastfeed their children have significantly higher rates of type 2 diabetes later in life than moms who breastfed, report University of Pittsburgh researchers in a study published in the September issue of...

Prematurity, infections most likely causes of brain damage among infants

The most likely causes of brain damage among low birthweight infants are prematurity and infections, not oxygen starvation, a Johns Hopkins study has found. Studying 213 babies born weighing less than 3 pounds, 5 ounces, the researchers noted that the smaller the infants were at birth and the less time they spent in the womb, the more likely they were to have some form of brain damage. Babies born with infections were more likely than those without infections to have brain complications. The report is published in the June issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Get more stuff like this
in your inbox

From anti-aging to the search for alien life, we promise to never bore.