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Parkinson’s Disease Linked to High Iron Intake

People with high levels of iron in their diet are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a study in the June 10 issue of Neurology. People with both high levels of iron and manganese were nearly two times more likely to develop the disease than those with the lowest levels of the minerals in their diets. The study compared 250 people who were newly diagnosed with Parkinson's to 388 people without the disease. Interviews were conducted to determine how often participants ate certain foods during their adult life.

New protein could help protect against neuro-degenerative diseases

A team of researchers from Imperial College London, the Charing Cross Hospital and University College London have identified a protein which could be used to protect against neuro-degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, motor neurone diseases and the damage caused by strokes.

Toxic Molecule May Provide Key for Developing Vaccine

Researchers have discovered an important similarity in the causes of cell degeneration and death in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, type II diabetes and CJD, suggesting that a single therapy could combat these different ailments.

Single therapy may treat Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Mad Cow

Researchers have discovered an important similarity in the causes of cell degeneration and death in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, type II diabetes and CJD, suggesting that a single therapy could combat these different ailments. University of California at Irvine molecular biologists Charles Glabe and Rakez Kayed found that small toxic molecules believed to trigger cell damage in these diseases have a similar structure. The study, which appears in the April 18, 2003 issue of Science, implies that these molecules, called toxic soluble oligomers, share parallel functions, which makes them suitable targets for new drugs or vaccines that could halt progression of many degenerative diseases.

Findings About Parkinson's Disease: Coffee and Hormones Don't Mix

Several large studies have shown that caffeine intake is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) in men, but studies in women have been inconclusive. A new study shows that hormone therapy is a possible explanation for the different effects of caffeine on PD risk in men and women.

Genetic Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease Discovered

Inherited variations in proteins that produce energy for the body may provide protection from developing Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at Duke University Medical Center. Furthermore, the inherited gene variations seem particularly to protect white women, which may help explain why Parkinson's disease is seen more often in men.

Fruit consumption related to increased risk of Parkinson's?

Researchers in Honolulu have found a correlation between high fruit and fruit drink consumption and risk of Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have suggested a link between fruit and vitamin C intake and an increased risk of Parkinson's. However, these studies have been primarily retrospective in design and are subject to recall bias. The current study is longitudinal, in which risk factor data was collected before onset of Parkinson's among more than 8,000 study subjects. Incidence of Parkinson's cases was noted over 34 years of observation. Results of the study show that increased fruit and fruit drink consumption predicted an increased Parkinson's risk, after adjusting for other known risk factors.

Neurotoxicity of insecticide yields clues to Parkinson's

Virginia Tech researchers have discovered that exposure to some insecticides may cause a cascade of chemical events in the brain that could lead to Parkinson?s Disease. "We found low-level exposures set in motion a process with an early onset that develops slowly and is persistent," one of the lead researchers said. "More surprising is that high-level exposures resulted in few immediate effects that we could observe, but in the longer term there was a delayed effect."

Growth factor shows promise in Parkinson's patients

By pumping a potent growth factor directly into the human brain, an international team of scientists and surgeons has demonstrated significant remediation of the debilitating symptoms of patients with Parkinson's disease.

Parkinson's symptoms shown on PET scans

A neurologist has used an advanced form of brain imaging to identify changes in small regions of the brains of living Parkinson's disease patients for the first time. These scientists analyzed positron emission tomography (PET) scans of the brains of 41 Parkinson's patients and 16 normal individuals obtained at the Hammersmith Hospital, part of the Imperial College of Medicine in London, England. The scans focused on two small areas found deep in the brain called the locus coeruleus and raphe, areas that control attention and wakefulness. The analysis found positive evidence of degeneration of nerve cells in these areas.

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