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Deportation worries fuel anxiety, poor sleep, among U.S.-born Latina/o youth

The rise of anti-immigration rhetoric and policies in the United States following the 2016 presidential election may be taking its toll on the health...

Visual Framing by Media in Debates Affects Public Perception

Both Democratic and Republican Party front-runners benefited from preferential visual coverage during the televised 2016 presidential primary debates, according to a new study published...

New Platform Flips Traditional On-Demand Supply Chain Approach on its Head

Imagine you are heading to the grocery store and receive a phone alert asking if you’d also be willing to bring your neighbor’s groceries...

9,000 years ago, a community with modern urban problems

Some 9,000 years ago, residents of one of the world’s first large farming communities were also among the first humans to experience some of...

Guns are often obtained just days before a crime, study finds

Guns recovered from crimes are often a decade old, but knowing when a gun was manufactured doesn’t reveal how many times it may have...

Why are STEM students abandoning academic career paths?

Faculty in the STEM fields are powerful forces in shaping engineering and computing education—the profession’s essential source of training and skills development. But even...

Record-low fertility rates linked to decline in stable manufacturing jobs

As the Great Recession wiped out nearly 9 million jobs and 19 trillion dollars in wealth from U.S. households, American families experienced another steep...

Handgun licensing more effective at reducing gun deaths than background checks alone

A new white paper from the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health concludes...

How Sweden went from ‘least democratic’ to welfare state

In a new study, Lund University economic historian Erik Bengtsson debunks the myth that Sweden was destined to become a social democratic country. Instead,...

Stanford-led study investigates how much climate change affects the risk of armed conflict

Intensifying climate change will increase the future risk of violent armed conflict within countries, according to a study published today in the journal Nature. Synthesizing views...

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