Tag: breast cancer screening

New breast cancer imaging technique could cut down on false positives

A joint BYU-Utah research team is developing a new breast cancer screening technique that has the potential to reduce false positives, and, possibly, minimize...

Student innovation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute could lead to better breast...

Troy, N.Y. -- Recent research by doctoral student Sevan Goenezen holds the promise of becoming a powerful new weapon in the fight against breast cancer. His complex computational research has led to a fast, inexpensive new method for using...

Breast cancer screening with MRI benefits women with radiation therapy history

OAK BROOK, Ill. -- Breast cancer screening with MRI can detect invasive cancers missed on mammography in women who've undergone chest irradiation for other diseases, according to a new study published online and in the April print edition of Radiol...

Yearly mammograms from age 40 save 71 percent more lives, study...

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- A new study questions the controversial U.S. Preventative Service Task Force recommendations for breast cancer screening, with data that shows starting at a younger age and screening more frequently will result in more lives sa...

Women with false-positive mammograms report high anxiety and reduced quality of...

Doctors are calling for women to receive more information about the pitfalls of breast cancer screening, as well as the benefits, after some women who received false-positive results faced serious anxiety and reduced quality of life for at least a y...

Mammogram sensitivity depends on menstrual cycle

SEATTLE -- Try to schedule your screening mammogram during the first week of your menstrual cycle. It might make breast cancer screening more accurate for pre-menopausal women who choose to have regular mammograms. This recommendation comes from an ...

Annual breast cancer screening beginning at age 40 reduces mastectomy risk

CHICAGO -- Having a yearly mammogram greatly reduces the risk of mastectomy following breast cancer in women between the ages of 40 and 50, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSN...

Cancer detector works both ways

Dual use technology usually starts out with a military use that civilians find a way to commercialize. The U.S. Navy is hoping to turn that equation around with a $5 million program to improve breast cancer detection. As it happens, looking for a cancerous cell in a human breast relies on a lot of the same science as identifying targets in spy satellite photos. And since the Navy believes its current pick-'em-out technology has hit a ceiling, it hopes to develop advances in breast cancer screening that can be applied to spotting Osama bin Laden from space. Wired has a terrific story on this, and notes that real-world applications are already emerging.

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