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Use of mood-stabilizing drug linked with reduced risk of developing head...

A new study indicates that a commonly used mood stabilizing drug may help prevent head and neck cancer. The study is published early online...

Single bacterial super-clone behind world epidemic of drug-resistant E. coli

Virulent, drug-resistant forms of E. coli that have recently spread around the world emerged from a single strain of the bacteria – not many...

New tool helps detect delirium in hospital patients

UC San Francisco researchers have developed a two-minute assessment tool to help hospital staff predict a patient’s risk of delirium, a change in mental...

Why Low-Income Patients Prefer Hospital Care to a Doctor’s Office

Patients with low socioeconomic status use emergency and hospital care more often than primary care because they believe hospital care is more affordable and...

Few hospitals aggressively combat catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Hospitals are working harder than ever to prevent hospital-acquired infections, but a nationwide survey shows few are aggressively combating the most common one -- catheter-associated urinary tract infections. In the survey by...

Researchers measure quality of care in oral anticoagulation

(Boston) - Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the Bedford VA Medical Center believe that risk-adjusted percent time in therapeutic range (TTR) should be used as part of an effort to improve anticoagulation control and...

Returning troops face both physical and mental challenges

Is the US health system comprehensively meeting the needs of returning veterans? With the recent attention to mental illness in returning soldiers, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in particular, little research has focused on the medical c...

Study points to methods for safe drug dispensing via computer

Researchers have found that a new computer system that uses bar codes to safeguard patients' medications will work successfully, but not without creating new, serious problems for nurses charged with patient care. "In general, we viewed the system as successful. There are no magic bullet solutions to human error in any setting, and even the best systems will require constant maintenance and flexible redesign after implementation," said Emily Patterson, a research specialist in Ohio State's Institute for Ergonomics.

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