Quantcast

8-hour time-restricted eating linked to a 91% higher risk of cardiovascular death

A new study has found that people who limit their eating to less than 8 hours per day may be at a higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, compared to those who eat over a 12-16 hour period.

The analysis of over 20,000 U.S. adults, presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention│Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Scientific Sessions 2024, revealed some surprising findings about the long-term effects of time-restricted eating.

“Restricting daily eating time to a short period, such as 8 hours per day, has gained popularity in recent years as a way to lose weight and improve heart health,” said the study’s senior author, Victor Wenze Zhong, Ph.D., a professor and chair of the department of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in Shanghai, China. “However, the long-term health effects of time-restricted eating, including risk of death from any cause or cardiovascular disease, are unknown.”

The study found that people who followed an 8-hour time-restricted eating plan had a 91% higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, compared to those who ate over a 12-16 hour period. The increased risk was also seen in people with existing heart disease or cancer.

“We were surprised to find that people who followed an 8-hour, time-restricted eating schedule were more likely to die from cardiovascular disease,” Zhong said. “Even though this type of diet has been popular due to its potential short-term benefits, our research clearly shows that, compared with a typical eating time range of 12-16 hours per day, a shorter eating duration was not associated with living longer.”

The study’s findings encourage a more cautious, personalized approach to dietary recommendations, particularly for those with existing health conditions.

“It’s crucial for patients, particularly those with existing heart conditions or cancer, to be aware of the association between an 8-hour eating window and increased risk of cardiovascular death,” Zhong said. “Our study’s findings encourage a more cautious, personalized approach to dietary recommendations, ensuring that they are aligned with an individual’s health status and the latest scientific evidence.”




The material in this press release comes from the originating research organization. Content may be edited for style and length. Want more? Sign up for our daily email.